Meet the Science UDRs at the Ultimate Science Navigation Event (9/23)

Ultimate Science Navigation posterAt The Ultimate Science Navigation event TOMORROW (9/23), students can collaborate with the science UDRs to learn about the different offerings in the sciences, how to navigate each major/minor, what each major/minor has to offer, all with an emphasis on exploring the intersections between different programs in the sciences. We will have UDRs representing biochemistry, biology, neuroscience, chemistry, physics, and biophysics!

Students can join in the morning on Zoom from 9:30-10AM, or for the rest of the day through the new Brandeis science community Slack workspace to discuss their questions related to the majors with the UDRs! Email Lance Babcock (lbabcock@brandeis.edu), Maggie Wang (maki@brandeis.edu) or the other science UDRs for the Zoom link and Slack workspace link.

Working towards diversity, equity and inclusion in the sciences

Bulbul ChakrabortyBulbul Chakraborty
Enid and Nate Ancell Professor of Physics
Division Head, Sciences, School of Arts and Sciences

This blog is addressed to my colleagues in the division of science. 

As scientists, we pride ourselves on solving problems, often ones that lead to paradigm shifts.  A challenge that we have all grappled with is how to cultivate and nurture a truly diverse community of scientists.  How do we create an environment that is inclusive and accessible to all that seek to enter the sciences and experience the invigorating practice of  science that  we live and breathe?  How do we open our doors and not be gatekeepers? 

I am writing this blog because the many conversations that I have had over this summer has convinced me that this is the right time for a concerted effort to push towards our objectives. As scientists we know that half the battle is going to the core of a problem, and representing it in a way that tells us what actions to take.   What I have become aware of is  that the anecdotal evidence on who leaves the sciences is being made quantitative and rigorous.  Words are being put to our experiences and structures are being offered that we can use to take actions.  We have colleagues at Brandeis and in the broader community of science educators that have thought long and hard about how to bring about change in STEM education. We can all learn from them.  

I am urging all of you to share resources that you are aware of that will help us create actionable goals and structural changes.  Towards that, here is a link to an organization called “SEA CHANGE”, within the auspices of the American Association for the Advancement of Science: https://seachange.aaas.org/.  In particular, they are hosting a series of Webinars under the banner “Talking about Leaving Revisited”: https://seachange.aaas.org/events  that I have registered for and I encourage you to do so if you can.

I intend to make this a monthly blog that reflects my thoughts on diversity, equity and inclusion in the sciences at Brandeis.

SPROUT and I-Corps Applications are Open

Sprout logoThe Brandeis Innovation SPROUT and I-Corps programs offer support for bench and non-bench research. Both programs offer funding in different amounts, mentorship, training and help in further exploring the commercial potential of inventions. SPROUT supports bench research, while I-Corps emphasizes training for both bench and non-bench researchers in developing the commercial potential of discoveries, with small grants and extensive training programs. You can apply to one or both programs.

  • If you have a technology / solution that you have started developing and you would like to get funding for it via SPROUT and/or I-Corps, then please complete this form
  • If you do not already have a technology, then you can complete this form to qualify for the I-Corps training program and be matched with a team

Icorps logo

SPROUT teams will get the chance to qualify for up to $30,000 in funding. The I-Corps program provides entrepreneurial training and covers the core of commercializing a technology or building a startup. It comes with an NSF $750 travel and training stipend and an NSF I-Corps certificate/digital badge.

Apply by February 25, 2020 at 11:59PM

MRSEC & RTI Hosts Science Outreach to Waltham Teachers

The Brandeis Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) and the Brandeis Research Technology and Innovation (or MakerLab) hosted a day of science and technology outreach on November 5, 2019. In the morning and for the fifth straight year, 23 Waltham High School Science teachers participated in a professional development workshop with 15 Brandeis scientists called, “Brandeis Scientists in the Classroom.” The teams of scientists and teachers visited laboratories and developed curriculum for the scientists to make future classroom visits to the High School to increase awareness of Brandeis science and to encourage WHS students to pursue STEM careers. In the afternoon, the teams were joined by more than 60 Brandeis students, staff and members of the greater community for a public event called, “Watch:City Science and Technology Forum.” This event celebrated Waltham and Brandeis as hubs of technology and discovery and promoted SciLinkR.com as a way to connect with professionals and promote science. There were short talks about public engagement with science by Waltham High School teachers Marisa Maddox and Ellen Stanton and by Brandeis scientists, Professor Avi Rodal, Dr. Anique Olivier-Mason, Dr. Vivek Vimal, and Raul Ramos. Participants also networked with each other during the poster session (20 posters by Brandeis scientists) and explored the gallery of Brandeis contributions to the Journal of Stories in Science. The organizers’ goal was for attendees to gain new perspectives in science and technology.

The event was sponsored by the Brandeis MRSEC, Research Technology & Innovation, Library, Hassenfeld Family Innovation Center, Nova BioMedical, AstraZeneca, and the New England Journal of Medicine.

 

 

 

GreenLabs Recycling: An Innovative Answer to Lab Waste

GreenLabs Recycling

Several years ago, Brenda Lemos and David Waterman, at the time Brandeis graduate students working in Jim Haber’s lab, noticed that clean, polypropylene (#5 plastic) pipette tip boxes were being thrown away. Although never contaminated in the lab, these boxes are typically labeled “medical waste” and blocked from recycling, ultimately ending up in landfills. This is a problem given that 10 million pipette boxes are purchased each year and most often can’t be reloaded and reused. The boxes end up becoming part of the 6 million tons of plastic waste that are produced by 20,500 research institutions world-wide.

That is when the now Dr. Waterman and the future Dr. Lemos, created the GreenLabs Recycling program. Rather than the pipette boxes being disposed of in a landfill, they are now being diverted into recycling at the point of use by the people who are using them.

Pipette box binThe system works this way: GreenLabs Recycling places recycling bins at participating labs. Scientists in the labs place the pipette boxes into the recycling bins as they are used. “Participation in this program has been great. Other scientists understand the importance of recycling these materials,” David said.  Brenda and David collect the bins and bring the materials back to a facility in Acton. There the boxes are sorted by cleanliness, color and type of plastic. After sorting, the boxes are granulated and used at local manufacturers. They prefer to use Massachusetts-based manufacturers in order to reduce the environmental impact of shipping the materials.

They are currently collecting lab plastics at five locations – Brandeis, other universities, and small and large biotech companies in the area. They expect to be soon working with two additional locations.

What are the future plans for GreenLabs Recycling? David said that they would eventually like to take the recycled plastics and manufacture their own long-lasting, permanent products such as trash cans, recycling bins, and non-disposable office products.

David credits the Brandeis Innovations Sprout Program and Icorp™ Program for their support. “They have been a huge help”, he said.

GreenLabs will be participating in the Mass Innovation Nights event on Thursday, March 14. This event will be held from 6:00 to 8:00 PM at the Faculty Club and features new, innovative products from Brandeis students, alumni, and staff. This event is free and open to the public.

2019 SACNAS Regional Meeting to be held at Brandeis

Brandeis University will be hosting the 2019 New England SACNAS Regional Meeting on Saturday, March 23, 2019 from 9am-5pm.

SACNAS is an inclusive organization dedicated to fostering the success of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans, from college students to professionals, in attaining advanced degrees, careers, and positions of leadership in STEM. More information about this event is available at the Brandeis SACNAS site.

Dr. Tepring Piquado, a Policy Researcher at RAND Corporation and Brandeis alum and Dr. Marcelle Soares-Santos, the Landsman Assistant Professor at Brandeis, will be keynote speakers. More information about the speakers and the Career and Professional development workshops and panel discussions are available as well.

This meeting is FREE, but all attendees must register by February 22, 2019.

 

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