Claude Desplan to speak in Bauer Distinguished Lecturer Series

Claude Desplan, Silver Professor and Professor of Biology at NYU, will visit Brandeis the week of March 21-25 as part of the M.R.Bauer Foundation Distinguished Lecturer Series. Desplan’s work focuses on developmental biology in insects, and is particularly concerned with pattern formation. A recent topic of interest is the development of the neural network that supports color vision in the optic lobe of the fruit fly.

Desplan will speak on Monday, March 21 at 4:00 pm in Gerstenzang 121. The title of his talk will be “Processing of Color Information in Drosophilia”. Desplan will speak again at Neurobiology Journal Club on March 22 at 12:05 pm in Gerstenzang 121.

According to a post at ratemyprofessors.com:

Desplan is the funniest, nicest guy ever. At first you may not be able to understand him too too easily due to his french accent but after a few days that’s not a problem. Desplan went pretty slow and went over concepts that people didn’t seem to understand. Even then he held very helpful review sessions. Great professor.

 

Fostering leaders into a new scientific generation

Brandeis SACNAS Chapter Symposium
Saturday, March 26, 2011
10:00 am-3:00 pm
Shapiro Science Campus lobby

On March 26th the Brandeis SACNAS chapter will be holding their 2nd Brandeis SACNAS Chapter Symposium 2011: Fostering leaders into a new scientific generation. This year, we hope to expand our circle of influence even farther as we look forward to hosting students and mentors from Brandeis and other institutions in the greater Boston Region. We want to create a forum for students to network and learn about the different pathways that the sciences have to offer.

This year we will have Dr. Daniel Colon-Ramos, Assistant Professor of Cell Biology at Yale University, talk about his journey from early undergraduate to PhD. Dr. Jim Morris from Brandeis will discuss his track towards earning his MD/PhD at Harvard Medical School. Lastly, we will also hear from our own chapter President Kerwin Vega, fourth year undergraduate, as he speaks of his first steps towards pursuing a career in science and his networking experiences thus far. We will also host a Career Development Panel where professionals from various scientific backgrounds will briefly speak of their personal professional anecdotes as well as answer any questions. There will also be a poster session for students to present their work.

See story in The Jusiice

13th Annual Northeast Student Chemistry Research Conference (NSCRC)

The timing and location of this conference would seem to make it ideal for undergraduates to present their research — follow the links below if interested.

April Jewell of the NSYCC wrote:

As Chair of the Northeast Section Younger Chemist Committee (NSYCC), I would like to invite the Undergraduate and Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Candidates from your department to participate in the 13th Annual Northeast Student Chemistry Research Conference (NSCRC). I would appreciate it if you would forward this information on my behalf. The NSCRC will be held at Northeastern University’s Curry Student Center on Saturday, April 30th, 2011.

The Northeast Student Chemistry Research Conference (NSCRC) is organized for students by students. It is devoted to the research of undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral chemistry students, providing a relaxed atmosphere for students to share their work. The day-long event features student poster and oral research presentations, a keynote speaker, awards, and catered lunch. The conference encourages students to network and get feedback from their peers. The 1st NSCRC was held April 24, 1999 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

The deadline for abstract submission is Friday, April 8th, at 5pm. Please visit our website at nsycc.org for submission instructions.

Inaugural Neuro + MCB Graduate Student Social a Success

On Friday January 14th the first of an anticipated quarterly series of social events for Biology graduate students took place.  The concept for this entirely student-funded gathering was developed by myself (Scott Neal, MCB) and co-organizer Sean O’Toole (Neuro) with two goals in mind.  First, it would represent an opportunity to introduce first year students to their more senior classmates, many of whom they have not yet had occasion to interact with.  Additionally, it would generate a greater sense of community amongst all students in the Neuroscience and MCB graduate programs.  We strongly believe that social interaction is an integral part of graduate student life.  Too often students become isolated within their own labs and we wished to provide a means to change this.  By encouraging our colleagues to engage each other outside of the academic forum their graduate student experiences, and by extension their scientific productivity, might be improved.  This interaction may also foster inter-lab collaborations and promote mentorship opportunities.

Nearly half of all enrolled graduate students in the MCB and Neuroscience programs were welcomed to this event where they enjoyed snacks, beverages and conversation.  It provided an opportunity for graduate students to breach the normal social barriers (e.g. working in different buildings) and to learn about the interests of and approaches taken by our classmates as they develop their young careers. One attendee commented “We really need to do this more often; this was a great idea!”  Based on the success of this event we hope to expand future gatherings to include post-doctoral fellows and other life science graduate students.  These inclusions might create additional mentorship opportunities and will broaden the perspectives of all participants.

We all stand to benefit from camaraderie within the Brandeis Life Sciences community, whether it be from the ease at which we can walk down the hall to borrow a reagent or by the simple pleasure of recognizing each other and exchanging a brief “hello” as we rush to our next experiment.  Thank you to all of the students who participated and otherwise contributed to the success of this inaugural event.

Biochemistry, Biophysics and Quantitative Biology Retreat 2010

Grad students, postdocs and faculty from the Graduate Program in Biochemistry & Biophysics and from the interdisciplinary program in Quantitative Biology gathered for their Annual Retreat October 21-22, 2010 at Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, MA. See the program here.

Announcing the First Annual Shapiro Science Center Chili Cook-off!

Friday, June 4th

4:30pm

2nd floor Shapiro Science Center atrium

This Friday, amaze your colleagues with your culinary prowess and throw together your favorite chili recipe– who knows, it could get you inducted into the Waltham Academy of Colon Chaos!

Just bring in some chili, crockpotted or not, cornbread optional (but encouraged!), and enjoy a drink and good company while you sample the chilies of your peers.  You will have the chance to vote for your favorite, and a winner will be chosen.  There are already at least FOUR confirmed competitors– and we hope to see YOU there!

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