Dmitry Kleinbock is awarded a Simons Fellowship in Mathematics

Dmitry KleinbockProfessor of Mathematics Dmitry Kleinbock has been awarded a prestigious Simons Fellowship in Mathematics, which will support research activities during his sabbatical leave in the fall of 2022.

Kleinbock’s research deals with dynamical systems of algebraic origin and their applications to number theory. A dynamical system is simply a set of points together with an evolution law that governs the way points move over time. It turns out that many mathematical problems concerning integer solutions of some equations or inequalities can be understood in terms of the behavior of certain dynamical systems. Furthermore, systems that arise in this context are of algebraic nature (so called flows on homogeneous spaces of Lie groups), which makes it possible to use a wide variety of sophisticated tools such as representation theory, hyperbolic geometry and geometry of lattices.

During the Spring 2022 semester Kleinbock is visiting the Institute for Mathematical Research at ETH (Zürich, Switzerland), giving a lecture course on the topic of dynamics on homogeneous spaces. The plan for the spring is to finish several projects and start new collaborations. Then in the Fall 2022 semester Kleinbock will be a member of a thematic program on Applications of Dynamics in Number Theory and Algebraic Geometry at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton, NJ, led by Tamar Ziegler (Hebrew University, Jerusalem). This will be an excellent opportunity, thanks to the Simons Fellowship, to explore further connections between dynamics and number theory.

Grace Han and 2 Alumni Receive 2022 Sloan Foundation Fellowships

Grace Han group photo

Grace Han (left) and her group.

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has announced the winners of the 2022 Sloan Research Fellowships. These fellowships are awarded to early-career scientists that represent the most promising researchers working today. Winners receive $75,000, which can be used to support their research over a two-year term. Grace Han, Assistant Professor of Chemistry and the Landsman Career Development Chair in the Sciences is one of the 2022 recipients.

The major goal of Dr. Grace Han’s research program is to develop functional organic material systems that exhibit phase transitions triggered by external stimuli, notably light. The photo-controlled phase-change materials have a game-changing potential in waste heat recycling and storage, photo-actuation, photo-lithography, and photo-regulated adhesion. In particular, the novel strategy to optically ‘fix’ a liquid phase under fluctuating temperatures allows for a long-term latent heat storage and a triggered release of energy, which is not attainable by conventional phase-change materials such as paraffins or salt hydrates. To achieve this goal, her team investigates the photo-induced structural and polarity changes of molecular switches based on azobenzene, which reversibly controls the phase of materials.
The Sloan Research Fellowship will support the new direction of Han group’s research in expanding the materials set by the rational design of photoswitches with enhanced optical and thermal properties, which will address the challenges of the current state-of-the-art switches.
Two Brandeis alumni also received 2022 fellowships: Netta Engelhardt, BS ’11 (Physics) and Dapeng Bi, PhD ’12 (Physics).

Anish Ghosh receives the 2021 Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize

Anish Ghosh has received the 2021 Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize in Mathematical Sciences. The Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar Prize is India’s highest science award within the country. While at Brandeis, Anish Ghosh was the student of Dmitry Kleinbock, Professor of Mathematics. He is currently a faculty member at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai where he specializes in Ergodic Theory and Number Theory.

Kleinbock wrote the following about his former student:

“It was a great pleasure to find out that Anish Ghosh, my former student here at Brandeis, has received the Shanti Swarup Bhatnagar prize. Anish is a talented mathematician working in the field of ergodic theory on homogeneous spaces. Interest in this field rose significantly during the late 1980s and early 1990s after the seminal achievements of Marina Ratner and Anish’s mathematical grandfather Gregory Margulis, whose work, in particular the proof of the Oppenheim Conjecture, has since served as a basis for numerous links between dynamics and number theory.”

“Anish has been exploring connections between the two fields throughout his mathematical career. Since his graduation in 2006 he has authored more than 40 papers, many published in top-level journals, and has become one of a few people who are shaping the subject of ergodic theory and its arithmetical applications. Among his notable achievements I can mention the work on distribution of dense lattice orbits in homogeneous spaces, on intrinsic Diophantine approximation, on applications of equidistribution to counting lattice points and – most recently – an approach to quantitative Oppenheim-type problems involving Rogers’ moment formulas.”

“Anish has also been a great mentor, who as of now has produced at least 8 PhD students and collaborated with them extensively on various problems. He has lectured extensively on the subject of connections of dynamics and number theory and edited several collections of papers. To summarize, the Bhatnagar Prize is well deserved, and I am positive that the mathematical talent of Anish Ghosh will continue to flourish.”

Schmidt-Rohr examines why plants need two different photosystems

In a recent paper in Life (Basel), Klaus Schmidt-Rohr, Professor of Chemistry, introduces a self-explanatory description of the energetics of photosynthesis in plants, the so-called EZ-scheme. It shows the energies of molecules in kJ/mol instead of the classical Z-scheme’s shifted energy differences that are misleadingly encrypted in volts. Unlike its predecessor, the EZ-scheme includes the Kok cycle in the water-splitting complex, charge separation after photon absorption, and the Calvin cycle with carbohydrate synthesis (in a simplified form). It also shows O2 correctly as a high-energy product, due to its relatively weak double bond, and demonstrates that Photosystem II pumps more of the absorbed photon energy into O2 than into the plant.

This paper provides the first valid explanation of why plants need two different photosystems: PSII mostly extracts hydrogen (as protons plus electrons) from H2O, producing PQH2 (plastoquinol), and generates the energetically expensive product O2, providing little energy directly to the plant. PSI is needed to produce significant chemical energy for the organism, in the form of ATP, and to generate a less reluctant hydrogen donor, NADPH. This work fundamentally revises received notions of the energetics of photosynthesis, by pointing out the classical Z-scheme’s bewildering implication that H2O gives off electrons spontaneously to chlorophyll while releasing energy, and by showing that the concept of energy transport by “high-energy electrons” in photosynthesis is misguided, since energy and electrons flow in opposite directions.

Figure #1 from Schmidt-Rohr paper

Figure 1 Simplified EZ-scheme of the energetics of photosynthesis in plants, converting H2O and CO2 to O2 and carbohydrate, [CH2O]. The direction of energy transfer and release is indicated by straight red arrows at the top, formal hydrogen transfer by blue dashed curved arrows at the bottom of the diagram. Three dots … indicate omitted redox reactions.

Schmidt-Rohr K. O2 and Other High-Energy Molecules in Photosynthesis: Why Plants Need Two Photosystems. Life (Basel). 2021 Nov 5;11(11):1191.

Brandeis Receives Grant to Further Collaboration with Hampton University

Irving EpsteinIn collaboration with Hampton University, an historically Black institution in Hampton, VA, Brandeis has received a $250,000 grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation’s Equity-Minded Pathways to STEM Graduate Education program to create a route for Hampton students to enroll in masters degree programs at Brandeis. The program will comprise summer research internships at Brandeis for Hampton juniors and a senior-year course at Hampton jointly developed and taught by Brandeis and Hampton faculty, as well as cohort-based mentoring during the students’ masters study.  It extends the existing Brandeis-Hampton collaboration associated with our Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) and will be led by Profs. Irving Epstein at Brandeis and Demetris Geddis at Hampton.

Drew Weissman ’81, MA ’81 Receives the Lasker Award

Drew WeissmanKatalin Karikó and Drew Weissman ’81, MA ’81 have received the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award. Weissman is a professor of medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Karikó is a senior vice president at BioNTech RNA Pharmaceuticals. The Lasker award is in recognition of their research into messenger RNA and the resulting therapeutic technology. It was their work that was so crucial in the rapid development of the COVID-19 vaccines. It should be noted that many winners of the Lasker award go on to receive the Nobel Prize.

Weissman and Kariko also received the Lewis S. Rosenstiel Award for Distinguished Work in Basic Medical Research award earlier this year.

The Washington Post profiled Weissman and his work in a recent article, “A scientific hunch. Then silence. Until the world needed a lifesaving vaccine.”

View Lasker acceptance remarks from Katalin Karikó and Drew Weissman.

 

 

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