Tag: brandeis summer (page 2 of 3)

Coronavirus/COVID-19 Update

In response to Coronavirus/COVID-19, Brandeis has moved all classes online. Summer School staff are currently working remotely but holding regular office hours.

At present, we anticipate that summer courses and programs will run as scheduled on campus, but this may change based on public health updates. Should this change, we will notify you immediately. Please sign up for the Summer School email list to receive news, updates, and notifications.

We are aware that this is a stressful time for everyone and we are here to assist in any way that we can. Learn what steps Brandeis is taking to protect our community.

Listed below are the steps that the CDC recommends to take in order to protect both yourself and others during this global pandemic:

1.  Clean your hands often

2.  Avoid close contact with others

3. Stay home if you are sick

4. Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze

5. Wear a facemask if you are sick

6. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily

Good Storytellers Can Change the World

Join Professor David Sherman at JBS this summer for Storytelling as Social Practice, to be held from June 1 – July 31, 2020

“The best argument in the world won’t change a person’s mind. The only thing that can do that is a good story.” (Richard Powers, The Overstory, 488)

This course builds on the vibrant storytelling movement currently traveling across the U.S.

With a focus on nineteenth- and twentieth-century writers such asIrving, Poe, Hawthorne, Twain, Chekhov, Mansfield, Hemingway, O’Connor, García Márquez, Johnson, Wallace, and Moore, this course will help to answer short story questions such as: How did the genre of the short story emerge and what distinctive work has it performed in its long and protean history? And why does the short story still matter?

You will consider the formal features of plots, characters, and narrative discourse, as well as read theoretical accounts of the role that narrative plays in personal identity, community belonging, moral judgment, historical knowledge, and political authority.

You will also participate in workshops to craft and perform stories as part of the Brandeis Storytelling Brigade. Through a series of collaborative exercises and rehearsals, you will develop a repertoire of at least four stories: one fictional story for young children, one folk tale for young children, one story based on historical research for young adults or adults, and one autobiographical or fictional story for young adults or adults.

This course will help you to develop skills in:

  • holding stage presence in body and voice
  • organizing and promoting performance events
  • participating constructively in a collaborative performance team
  • designing intricate plots, with a sense of how beginnings, middles, and ends shape human time
  • understanding character psychology and development as a part of a character system
  • researching the history of folk stories, as a strategy for doing cultural history
  • analyzing narrative in theoretically sophisticated ways, including political and philosophical investigations into how stories work and what they do
  • writing critically about the short story literary genre, as it has evolved from antiquity to the present

By the end of the JBS program you’ll have acquired a repertoire of stories and skills that can support your work in education, political advocacy, creative writing, theater, stand-up, clinical psychology, and other realms where stories circulate. By knowing the stories that you’re capable of telling, you can learn more about where and how you can be effective in the world.

APPLY TODAY!

Visit our application page to fill out a Summer 2020 JBS Application.

Questions?

If you have questions about the program, please email Prof. David Sherman at: dsherman@brandeis.edu.

Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

Study Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care this summer!

The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and well-being in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.”

This course lays a theoretical and empirical foundation for those interested in understanding how social factors (poverty, community context, work environments, etc.) affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States. You will develop tools to analyze epidemiological patterns of health status by race/ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status. In addition, you will learn how structural factors (racism, segregation, gender hierarchies, dominant cultural norms within health systems and organizations, and their intersections) contribute to health disparities, and how policies and practices inside and outside of the healthcare system are advancing health equity.

This Summer School course addresses the following inequity concerns and how they relate to health:

  • In New Orleans, the life expectancy of residents from the poorest zip code in the city is 26 years lower than for residents of the wealthiest zip code.
  • The median net worth for Black Bostonians is $8.00 compared to White median net worth of $247,500.00.
  • In 2015, women working full-time earned 80% of what men working full-time earned, and if trends continue, white women will have to wait until 2056 to see equal work for equal pay.
  • Hispanic women will have to wait 232 years for the pay gap to close without active policy intervention.

If you are interested in understanding how these social and structural factors affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States, then register for this summer’s Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care course.

Session 2 of Brandeis Summer School starts July 6!
Online courses are filling very quickly this summer so be sure to register soon!

 

Course Details:

HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care

With Jessica Santos, Ph.D. – view biography here.

Summer Session 2: July 6 to August 7, 2020

Online: Mondays, Tuesday, and Thursdays

Time: 8:30am – 11:00am

Brandeis Graduation Requirement Fulfilled: SS

View the Full Syllabus here.

 

Questions?

Email us at summerschool@brandeis.edu

Final Week of Summer School 2019

We have entered the final week of Brandeis Summer School 2019!

This summer included a variety of activities freely offered to students during the different sessions.

The Summer School team worked hard to provide an assortment of programs throughout the weeks and weekends to cater to all of our students’ varied schedules and interests.

Activities are designed to provide students with an opportunity to interact with their peers as well as the community around them. We realize our summer courses are academically challenging, and these activities are scheduled to help give students a study break.

Earlier this summer,  we took a group of students to Fenway Park to watch the Boston Red Sox play the Chicago White Sox. We also offered regular trips to local grocery stores, welcomed ice cream trucks to Brandeis, and helped get students off campus and into the city.

This week we will host an ice cream social, movie night, and trivia game in order to help students take some time to relax during their finals. For more information on Summer activities, visit our website.

You can also always email us with questions: summerschool@brandeis.edu

Lastly, be sure to follow us on social media to receive all of the latest Summer School updates: Instagram; Twitter; Facebook.

Good luck with finals!

Tell me your zip code, and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.

The environments where we live, learn, work, play, and pray shape our day-to-day lives and long-term health and well-being in complex ways. Dr. Anthony Iton, Senior Vice President for Healthy Communities at the California Endowment, famously said “tell me your zip code and I’ll tell you your life expectancy.”

If you are interested in understanding how these social and structural factors affect the health and well-being of racial and ethnic minorities and other vulnerable populations in the United States, then register for this summer’s Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care course!

This Summer School course addresses the following inequity concerns and how they relate to health:

  • In New Orleans, the life expectancy of residents from the poorest zip code in the city is 26 years lower than for residents of the wealthiest zip code.
  • The median net worth for Black Bostonians is $8.00 compared to
    White median net worth of $247,500.00.
  • In 2015, women working full-time earned 80% of what men
    working full-time earned, and if trends continue, white women will have to wait until 2056 to see equal work for equal pay.
  • Hispanic women will have to wait 232 years for the pay gap to close without active policy intervention.

This course will also review and critique key theoretical frameworks and evidence from public health, social policy, and community development that demonstrate how social and structural factors influence health and well-being, and how these same factors drive health disparities and inequities.

Each week, a case study of a health equity 2 policy, practice, or initiative will be analyzed, and the opportunities and challenges presented by the case will be discussed.

This course also prepares students interested in a wide range of disciplines to understand and advance health and equity in their future careers by achieving the following course outcomes:

  • Define key terms and constructs related to health disparities and health equity.
  • Identify patterns of inequities in health status by race, ethnicity, gender, and socio-economic status from an epidemiological perspective.
  • Explain how systems, policies, and ideologies contribute to disparities in rates of illness, quality of life, premature death, mental health, and population-level health inequities.
  • Identify and critique current theories for racial/ethnic disparities in health status, access and quality.
  • Become familiar with and critically assess conceptual models,
    policies, initiatives, and strategies for reducing and/or eliminating
    health disparities.

Space is Limited! Register Now!

Course Details:

HSSP 114B: Racial/Ethnic and Gender Inequalities in Health and Health Care 

With Jessica Santos, Ph.D.

Summer Session 2: July 8 to August 9, 2019

Meets Mondays, Tuesday, and Thursdays

View the Full Syllabus here.

Questions?

Email us at summerschool@brandeis.edu

« Older posts Newer posts »

Protected by Akismet
Blog with WordPress

Welcome Guest | Login (Brandeis Members Only)